Can Tetras Eat Betta Food? (How About Betta Pellets & Flakes?)

Image of tetras searching for food

Tetras and bettas will enlighten any fish tank. Both of these fish are compatible with each other and form a great pair in a community tank. When you have a community tank, the main concern is the diet. All your fish need to have some common food that they all can eat. So, can tetras eat betta food?

Yes, tetras can eat betta food. It is healthy and safe to feed betta food to tetras as it provides ample proteins to the tetras. However, since tetras are omnivores, they also need plant-based food in their regular diet. High-quality fish flakes along with live food is the ideal diet for tetras.

On the other hand, since bettas are carnivores, they have different dietary requirements. Bettas need high protein intake to stay healthy. So, let’s now discuss if you can feed the same food to your tetras and bettas, and many more points on their dietary needs.

Can Tetras And Bettas Eat The Same Food?

Tetras and bettas are popular among aquarists, and hence they are often kept together in the aquarium. Both these fish are not particular about their diet and don’t require any special diet.

Tetras graciously accept betta food. Similarly, bettas can survive for a while on a diet of only plant matter. However, the diet comprising mainly of plant matter will not provide the essential nutrients to your bettas. Hence, bettas cannot survive for too long on tetras’ food.

Each fish has its own dietary requirements. Bettas are primarily carnivores that require plenty of animal meat and protein for their optimum growth. On the other hand, tetras are omnivores that thrive on both animal and plant matter. Tetras do not require a diet that is rich only in protein for healthy growth.

For tetras, the best food is high-quality fish flakes, a mixture of food chips, frozen food, and wafers, along with live food. You can feed your tetras live or frozen brine shrimps, bloodworms, daphnia, fruit flies, micro worms, and mosquito larvae.

You can also feed some fruits like grapes, watermelon, orange, and strawberries to tetras occasionally. However, fruits should not be a part of their daily diet.

On the other hand, vegetables like peas, spinach, lettuce, and cucumber can be a part of tetras’ diet to provide variation.

Talking about bettas, they need a diet rich in protein to stay healthy. Bettas devour live insects, larvae, and small bugs. They need plenty of animal matter and proper nutrients in their everyday diet.

So, high-quality betta pellets along with live food will be the ideal diet for your bettas. If you provide tropical fish food flakes to bettas, it will not provide the essential nutrients for their growth.

To sum up, though tetras and bettas can eat the same food, it is not advisable to feed them the same food. It would be best to feed your fish a varied and nutritious diet that results in optimum growth.

Alright! Now you know tetras can thrive on betta food. However, it is not advisable to feed the same food to both these fish. But what if you feed betta pellets and flakes to tetras?

Recommended Further Reading:

Can Tetras Eat Betta Pellets?

Betta pellets are specifically meant for betta fish. These pellets make good daily food for bettas.

Tetras devour betta pellets. Since tetras are not fussy eaters, they eat anything that is offered to them. Pellets are no exception.

Pellets offer a superior base diet and hence are preferred by many aquarists for feeding their fish in a community tank.

Can Tetras Eat Betta Flakes?

Tetras do eat betta flakes. However, given a preference, tetras like to eat betta pellets over flakes. If you have a community tank with tetras and bettas living together, your tetras will ignore the betta flakes if they find betta pellets around them.

Tetras are small compared to bettas. Hence, their mouth is also smaller than bettas. Moreover, for a tetra fish, it is easier to take bites of pellets than flakes.

Also, pellets are a better staple food for tetras compared to flakes. So, given a choice, it is better to feed your tetras betta pellets rather than betta flakes, considering their nutritional value.

When you have a community tank, the biggest challenge is to feed the different fish species.

You need to ensure that all your fish get the required nutrition for healthy growth. So, let’s delve deeper into various ways to feed tetras and bettas together.

Related Further Reading:

How To Feed Tetras And Bettas Together?

Both tetras and bettas are not fussy eaters. They both enjoy the same basic diet. Hence it is easy to feed both these fish together. The only thing you need to be careful of is that they both shouldn’t squabble over food.

Fortunately, bettas are surface feeders. Hence, the moment you put food into the tank, bettas will be the first to grab the food. On the other hand, tetras will grab the food once it sinks through the water as they are bottom feeders.

You can use a quality flake or pellet food for both the fish. However, pellets should be small in size as a tetra’s mouth is smaller than that of a betta. High-quality betta pellets can serve the purpose for bettas as they devour meat/protein-based fish food.

Along with flakes and pellets, you can also incorporate live food into the tank. Brine shrimp, daphnia, and mosquito larvae are a great choice for tetras and bettas. If you don’t have live food, even frozen or freeze-dried are great alternatives. Both these fish will enjoy eating their meal as long as they are hungry.

You can even feed bloodworms to tetras and bettas. However, bloodworms should not be a part of their daily diet and should be used sparingly. Although bloodworms are a treat for your fish, they can cause constipation and swim bladder disease if consumed in large quantities.

Lastly, tetras also need plant matter in their diet as they are omnivores. Hence, you can give some blanched veggies to your tetras.

For both these species, providing a diverse diet will be the key to their optimum growth. Generally, the higher the quality of the food, and more the variety, the brighter will be the color of the fish.

Can Neon Tetras Eat Betta Food?

Neon tetras are omnivores, whereas bettas are carnivores. In the wild, neon tetras eat a wide variety of food, including insects, brine shrimp, daphnia, bloodworms, insect larvae, and even small fish eggs. At the same time, neon tetras love to eat various plant matter, veggies, and fruits.

Since neon tetras are not picky eaters, they will eat whatever is fed to them. So, if you have a community tank comprising neon tetras and bettas, your neon tetras will eat betta food. Neon tetras are known for their curiosity, be it to explore their surroundings or food variety.

Although neon tetras can eat betta food, it should not be their primary food source. If neon tetras eat betta food sometimes, it will not hurt them. However, it may hamper their health in the long run if they are continuously fed betta food.

Since bettas are carnivores, their food mainly consists of animal matter. They have a diet rich in protein. On the other hand, neon tetras are omnivores, and so they also need plant-based food for their optimum growth. Tetras need a balanced diet for their healthy development.

Although neon tetras can eat betta food, the same cannot be said for bettas. Bettas cannot thrive on neon tetra’s food.

Interesting Further Reading:

Can Ember Tetras Eat Betta Food?

Just like neon tetras, ember tetras can also eat betta food. The dietary requirements of ember tetras and bettas are quite similar. However, bettas being carnivores, need plenty of meaty protein in their diet. Ember tetras are omnivores. Hence, they prefer grazing on plants.

Sometimes you can even find ember tetras scraping microbe colonies that inhabit the plant leaves. The primary natural diet of ember tetras consists of small invertebrates and other zooplankton.

If you are feeding bloodworms, brine shrimp, or daphnia to your bettas, don’t be surprised if your ember tetras also try to eat them.

The best way to ensure that your fish stays healthy is to provide a diverse diet rich in proteins, vitamins, and minerals, keeping in mind their dietary requirements.