Where Do Tetras Come From? (Origins Of Various Tetra Species)

Image of tetras swimming in their natural habitat

Tetras are schooling fish and belong to the Characidae family. They are schooling fish and always live in groups for social reasons. So, where do tetras come from?

Tetras come from rivers and streams throughout South America, from Colombia through Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Guyana. They are also found in Africa’s Congo River flowing through Congo, Central African Republic, eastern Zambia, northern Angola, Cameroon, and Tanzania.

Let’s talk about this in detail now.

Where Do Cardinal Tetras Come From?

Cardinal tetras are native to the Orinoco River and the Rio Negro tributary of the Amazon River that flows through Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil in South America. They also inhabit Manaus in northern Brazil, and their presence is also found in the western parts of Colombia.

Cardinal tetras live in shaded areas covered with dense rainforests, where very little sunlight penetrates the water. And they grow up to a maximum of 1.5 inches in length.

They have bright ventral stripes, usually red but sometimes orange-red, with an iridescent blue line running down at the center of the body. They are a trendy fish breed due to their beautiful and vibrant color pattern.

Cardinal tetras are also peaceful, social fish and swim together in schools of ten or more. The number of tetras in a school can also depend on your aquarium size, but it shouldn’t be less than six.

Cardinal tetras are omnivores and can eat plant and meat-based food. In the wild, their diet primarily consists of invertebrates such as insect larvae and insect eggs.

In captivity, you can feed them cyclops, zooplankton, flake foods, pellets, frozen and live foods, including bloodworms, brine shrimp, mosquito larvae, and daphnia.

Male and female tetras have subtle physical differences. The female cardinal tetras have a rounder belly, which is visible during the breeding season. Males have slender bodies with a small hook sticking out on their anal fins.

Recommended Further Reading:

Where Do Neon Tetras Come From?

Neon tetras are small freshwater fish inhabiting the tropical waters of South America. They can be found in the Orinoco River and the Amazon River basins in the Western parts of Brazil, Southeastern Colombia, and Eastern Peru.

They live in the water underneath the dense forest canopies that allow very little sunlight to penetrate.

Neon tetras are small schooling fish that can grow up to 1.5 inches long. They have a turquoise blue line that stretches from the tip of the nose to the adipose fins.

Their bright and vibrant colors, peaceful behavior, and hardy nature make them a popular choice amongst aquarists.

Neon tetras are also social and swim together in schools of twelve or more. Therefore, you must keep at least six neon tetras if you have a small fish tank.

Neon tetras are omnivores and can eat both plant and meat matter. Their food consists of fallen fruits, carrion, algae, crustacean, insect larvae, and small invertebrates in the wild.

In your aquarium, you can feed them flake foods, pellets, frozen and live foods, including bloodworms, brine shrimp, mosquito larvae, and daphnia.

Female neon tetras are shorter in comparison to males. In addition, female tetras have a round belly that makes their horizontal blue stripes look curved. On the other hand, male tetras are slimmer and have straight blue stripes.

Related Further Reading:

Where Do Glowlight Tetras Come From?

Glowlight tetras come from the Essequibo River in Guyana, South America. They are also found in the Mazaruni River, a tributary of the Essequibo River in northern Guyana, and the Potaro river that runs from Mount Ayanganna area of the Pakaraima mountains before flowing into the Essequibo River.

Glowlight tetra is one of the smallest freshwater fish species available today and is also known as Fire Neon. They can grow up to 1.5 to 2 inches in size.

These tiny fish are known for their beautiful glowing eyes and iridescent scales. In addition, their vivid coloration makes these fish ideal for beginners who want to start keeping glowlights.

Like other tetras, glowlight tetras are also social and swim together in schools of twelve or more. Therefore, please be mindful to keep at least six neon tetras in case of a small fish tank.

Just like other tetras, glowlight tetras are also omnivores and can eat both plant and meat-based food. Their food consists of plant matter, algae, brine shrimp, insects larvae, bloodworms, daphnia, tubifex, and wingless fruit flies in the wild.

As an aquarium pet, you can feed them flakes, micro pellets, frozen and live foods, including bloodworms, brine shrimp, mosquito larvae, and daphnia.

Male glowlight tetras are more vibrant than females. However, there is not much of a color difference between them. Females are slightly larger and rounder than males. Males have slimmer bodies and longer fins than females.

Interesting Further Reading:

Where Do Rummy-Nose Tetras Come From?

Rummy-Nose tetras are native to the Amazon basin in South America, spread across Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. They are also found in the Rio-Vaupes River in Colombia and the Rio Negro River in Brazil.

Rummy-Nose tetras are also known as Firehead tetras. The name comes from the red-orange color on their nose.

They have an unconventional appearance, subtle character, and gentle behavior, making them popular among fish keepers. Rummy-Nose tetras can grow to around 2 to 2.5 inches in size.

The school size of rummy-nose tetras varies between five and fifteen. As shoaling fish, they must be kept in a group of six or more.

Like most tetra species, rummy-nose tetras prefer clean water with no floating debris. Their synchronized movements make them an incredible sight to watch.

Rummy-Nose tetras are omnivorous. They like eating almost everything. In the wild, they will eat tiny pieces of plant debris, small insects, insect larvae, or eggs.

So in an aquarium, you can feed them tiny pieces of plants and vegetables, algae, flakes, fish pellets, live and frozen foods such as bloodworms, mosquito larvae, and daphnia.

Male and female rummy-nose tetras look similar, and it isn’t easy to distinguish them by merely looking at them. However, males have slimmer bodies, and females look slightly bigger than males, especially when they have bigger bellies during breeding.

References