15 Fascinating Saltwater Fish that Look Like Frogs

Saltwater fish that looks like a frog

There are saltwater fish that don’t look like typical marine fish. Instead, they have a remarkable resemblance to a frog.

Given below are 15 such saltwater fish that look like frogs.

1. Clown Frogfish

Clown Frogfish

Clown frogfish, also known as warty frogfish, are marine fish species.

They inhabit the warm tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific region.

Clown frogfish can grow up to 15 cm or 5.9 inches in length. They look similar to other members of their family.

These fish have globulous bodies, and their soft flesh is coated with tiny spines.

The surface of their body is covered with numerous tiny bumps.

They have a large prognathous mouth that allows them to eat prey that is equal to their size.

Clown frogfish can quickly alter their skin color to match the background.

During coral bleaching events, they can even become completely white to blend in with their surroundings.

A clown frogfish is an aggressive predator that attacks any small animal within its strike range, including clams, shrimp, and small fish.

2. Giant Frogfish

Giant Frogfish

The giant frogfish, or the Commerson’s frogfish, is a saltwater fish that inhabits the tropical and subtropical waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Giant frogfish grow up to 38 cm or 15 inches in length. They have extensible bodies covered with small spines.

Giant frogfish can quickly adapt to different environments by changing their color within a few weeks.

However, the dominant color changes from grey to black, going through a spectrum of colors, including cream, pink, yellow, red, and brown.

These carnivores eat small animals that they find within their striking range.

The male and female giant frogfish come together during the mating period.

However, they are intolerant after the act, and the female can devour the male if he remains close.

3. Longlure Frogfish

Longlure Frogfish

The longlure frogfish is a saltwater fish found in the western Atlantic Ocean and along the coast of Central and South America.

These frogfish can grow up to 20 cm or 8 inches in length.

The outermost layer of their skin is made up of highly modified scales known as dermal spicules.

The primary color of a longlure frogfish varies widely, ranging from pale yellow to bright red or dark green to reddish-orange.

Black dots are found on its skin regardless of the base color.

As an opportunistic ambush hunter, this frogfish feeds mainly on fish, crustaceans, and mollusks.

The longlure frogfish will hide in a sponge and wait until prey comes close enough to be caught.

Then it will wiggle its lure to entice the prey. It has been known to swallow prey that is larger than itself.

4. Ocellated Frogfish

Ocellated Frogfish

The ocellated frogfish is a marine fish that inhabits the western Atlantic Ocean.

This frogfish grows up to 38 cm or 15 inches in length.

The ocellated frogfish has three prominent black dots on either side, each surrounded by a lighter ring.

It lives in rocky and coral reef environments and is the most prominent member of its family found in the western Atlantic Ocean.

This carnivore can camouflage itself to attack animals within its striking distance.

5. Painted Frogfish

Painted Frogfish

The painted frogfish, or spotted frogfish, is a marine fish that lives in the warm waters of the Indo-Pacific region.

This fish can grow up to 30 cm or 12 inches in length. Like other frogfish, it has soft skin covered with small dermal spinules.

The color of these frogfish varies greatly from each other because they usually color themselves according to their environment.

These fish can change their skin color and pigment patterns within a few weeks.

However, their primary color goes from white to black.

The painted frogfish is a carnivore that feeds on congeners and crustaceans.

The male painted frogfish can also eat the female if she sticks around after the act of fertilization.

6. Randall’s Frogfish

Take a look at what this fish looks like over here.

Randall’s frogfish is a marine fish that inhabits the waters of Easter Island, a Polynesian island located in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

This fish is commonly found in shallow waters or coral reefs with coral patches.

Randall’s frogfish is known for its long, claw-shaped pectoral fins that it uses for stability.

It usually hides under rocks or among seaweed to ambush its victims.

This frogfish comes in various shades of color, ranging from black to white and yellow to brown.

It differs from other frogfish because of its small white spots.

7. Sargassum Frogfish

Sargassum Frogfish

The sargassum frogfish can be found in the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans, where seaweed accumulates.

This frogfish can grow up to 20 cm or 7.9 inches in length.

It’s the only species that blends perfectly to camouflage in its seaweed environment.

It has a laterally compressed body with mottled and spotted yellow, brown, and green colors on a paler background.

Its fins have several dark bands.

Sargassum frogfish are ambush predators that eat anything they come across.

This stealthy predator relies on its cryptic coloration to protect itself.

8. Scarlet Frogfish

Scarlet Frogfish

The scarlet frogfish, also known as the freckled frogfish, is a marine fish inhabiting the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific oceans.

They can grow up to 13 cm or 5.1 inches in length.

These fish are usually found in reefs, rocky mounds, or spongy areas where they can escape preda­tors.

These fish come in various colors, including pale tan, mottled red, and yellow, often with tiny black dots on their bodies.

The scarlet frogfish is an ambush predator that uses bright-colored appendages to attract its prey.

Its camouflaging abilities help it to hide from predators.

9. Striated Frogfish

Striated Frogfish

The striated frogfish, also known as the hairy frogfish, can be found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans.

This fish grows up to 22 cm or 8.7 inches in length.

Like other frogfish, it has a round, globulous body and soft skin covered with spindles that look like hair.

These fish live in shallow water or rocky and coral reef environments.

They usually imitate corals or sponges by blending into their surroundings.

The striated frogfish is a carnivore that will eat anything within its reach, usually other animals, but sometimes even fish of its own species.

These fish are usually found alone.

During the breeding season, they gather together but can no longer tolerate each other after the fertilization act.

10. Shaggy Frogfish

Shaggy Frogfish

Shaggy frogfish, also known as hispid frogfish, are found in the tropical coastlines of the Indo-Pacific region.

These frogfish grow up to 20 cm or 7.9 inches in length.

Their skin has no systematic ornamentation but is covered by numerous small bumps resembling one’s hair.

This species lives in shallow rocky coral reefs and deep muddy environments.

It has a large, prognathous mouth, allowing it to eat prey that is as big as itself.

These carnivores feed on crustaceans and small fish.

However, the male shaggy frogfish can devour the female if she stays close after the fertilization period.

11. Red-Lipped Batfish

Red-Lipped Batfish

The red-lipped batfish belongs to the family Ogcocephalidae.

They can be found in the Pacific Ocean around the Galapagos Islands and off Peru.

This fish can grow up to 40 cm or 16 inches in length.

It has a light brown body and a greyish color on its back, with a white counter shade on the underside.

The fish has a black line from the head to the back of its tail. Its snout and horn are brownish-red in color.

The red-lipped batfish is a piscivore/invertivore, mainly eating smaller fish and invertebrates, such as shrimp, crabs, worms, and mollusks.

This batfish usually doesn’t have any direct threats.

However, a change in their natural habitat and rising sea temperature can result in a decline in their food source.

12. Tadpole Coffinfish

Take a look at what this fish looks like over here.

Tadpole coffinfish are marine fish that inhabit the deep waters of the Indian Ocean.

This fish can grow up to 7.2 cm or 2.8 inches in length. The tadpole coffinfish has a flabby body and a long tail covered with tiny spines.

These bottom dwellers are carnivores that feed on tiny crustaceans and small fish species.

13. Eastern Tadpole Coffinfish

Take a look at what this fish looks like over here.

The Eastern tadpole coffinfish is an anglerfish inhabiting the deep waters of Australia.

This fish can grow up to 10.9 cm or 4.3 inches in length. These fish have bodies that are densely covered by fine spinules.

They are transparent greyish tadpole-shaped creatures with short tails tipped with bait.

Their head, stomach, and most of the gills are dark blue, and the inner gills are black.

These carnivores eat tiny fish and invertebrates that are lured by the bait.

14. Pink Frogmouth

Take a look at what this fish looks like over here.

The pink frogmouth is a sea toad commonly found on continental shelves in tropical and temperate waters.

These fish can grow up to 40 cm or 16.7 inches in length.

They are bottom dwellers found in deep waters and along continental slopes.

This fish has a pinkish complexion and a frog-shaped mouth.

On top of its head is a unicorn horn that glows in the dark and lures curious fish into its trap.

The pink frogmouth is a carnivore that feeds on crustaceans and small fish.

15. Redeye Gaper

Take a look at what this fish looks like over here.

The redeye gaper is marine fish that inhabits the deep waters of the western North Atlantic Ocean.

This fish can grow up to 30.5 cm or 12 inches in length. It lives on the outer continental shelf near the dense coral rubble.

These fish have a round, compressed body and a huge skull, with a prominent lower jaw and teeth arranged in arches.

The redeye gaper has soft, loose, and malleable skin that can fold and cover its entire head and body.

Redeye gapers live at the sea bottom, resting on their pectoral fins and moving only to catch prey or escape danger.